Systematics and Biogeography of New World Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera: Heteroptera)

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<sup>1</sup>Address correspondence to: Joseph E. Eger, Jr. Field Biologist Dow AgroSciences, LLC 2606 S. Dundee St. Tampa, Florida
<sup>1</sup>Address correspondence to: Joseph E. Eger, Jr. Field Biologist Dow AgroSciences, LLC 2606 S. Dundee St. Tampa, Florida
United States of America, jeeger@dow.com, 1-813-294-9467
United States of America, jeeger@dow.com, 1-813-294-9467
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'''Abstract'''. This paper provides an overview of the systematics and zoogeography of the
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superfamily Pentatomoidea in the New World. Characters are given to help distinguish the
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major groups.
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'''Introduction'''
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The superfamily Pentatomoidea is worldwide in distribution and contains a number of pest
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and beneficial species. These bugs are significant pests of many crops including cotton, ''Gossypium
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hirsutum'' L., soybean, ''Glycine max'' Merrill, rice, ''Oryza sativa'' L., wheat, ''Triticum aestivum'' L., etc.
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(Schaefer y Panizzi 2000) and some are predaceous on pest insects. Recently there have been
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several introductions of Old World species into the New World. ''Halyomorpha halys'' (Stål), an Asian
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species, was introduced into the northeastern United States probably around 1996 (Hoebeke &
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Carter 2003). Since then it has spread considerably and is a serious crop and home invading pest.
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''Bagrada hilaris'' (Burmeister), also from Asia, was first found in California in 2008 and has become
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an important pest of crucifers in the southwestern United States (Palumbo y Natwick 2010). In
 +
2009, another Asian species from a family not previously known in the Western Hemisphere
 +
(Plataspidae) was found in the southeastern United States and has become a pest of soybean as
 +
well as a significant home invader (Eger et al. 2010; Gardner et al. 2013). An understanding of the
 +
systematics of this important group is needed to recognize future invasive bugs so that we can
 +
research known control methods and access potential natural enemies for classical biological
 +
control efforts.
 +
The purpose of this paper is to review the higher classification of Pentatomoidea known from
 +
the Americas and discuss their zoogeography.

Revisión de 19:51 23 ago 2013

Systematics and Biogeography of New World Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera: Heteroptera)

Joseph E. Eger1

1Address correspondence to: Joseph E. Eger, Jr. Field Biologist Dow AgroSciences, LLC 2606 S. Dundee St. Tampa, Florida United States of America, jeeger@dow.com, 1-813-294-9467

Abstract. This paper provides an overview of the systematics and zoogeography of the superfamily Pentatomoidea in the New World. Characters are given to help distinguish the major groups.

Introduction

The superfamily Pentatomoidea is worldwide in distribution and contains a number of pest and beneficial species. These bugs are significant pests of many crops including cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., soybean, Glycine max Merrill, rice, Oryza sativa L., wheat, Triticum aestivum L., etc. (Schaefer y Panizzi 2000) and some are predaceous on pest insects. Recently there have been several introductions of Old World species into the New World. Halyomorpha halys (Stål), an Asian species, was introduced into the northeastern United States probably around 1996 (Hoebeke & Carter 2003). Since then it has spread considerably and is a serious crop and home invading pest. Bagrada hilaris (Burmeister), also from Asia, was first found in California in 2008 and has become an important pest of crucifers in the southwestern United States (Palumbo y Natwick 2010). In 2009, another Asian species from a family not previously known in the Western Hemisphere (Plataspidae) was found in the southeastern United States and has become a pest of soybean as well as a significant home invader (Eger et al. 2010; Gardner et al. 2013). An understanding of the systematics of this important group is needed to recognize future invasive bugs so that we can research known control methods and access potential natural enemies for classical biological control efforts. The purpose of this paper is to review the higher classification of Pentatomoidea known from the Americas and discuss their zoogeography.

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